Fast Image Culling

Fast Image Culling

This video shows you how Exposure helps you quickly cull your images to find the very best ones. And you do all your work, both culling and editing, in one interface, so you can seamlessly transition between stages in your workflow.

Photos: Kyle Ford

This workflow will show you how Exposure helps you quickly cull your images to find the very best ones. Being able to do this quickly is a big part of an efficient workflow. Exposure helps you speed up this process.

I’m copying a portrait photo shoot from a camera card. I’ve already set up my copy parameters, so I’ve begun copying the images to my computer.

While the copy is underway, I’m able to begin working with the images immediately. There’s no waiting around on a slow import process. I’ll begin culling them. If I wanted to, I could also start editing them.

A great place to start is by assigning a reject flag to any shots I know I won’t edit.

I can use the mouse, or I can use the shortcut keys built into Exposure. These shortcut keys cover most of the culling steps in Exposure, and help you work even faster.

You can view or print out a PDF of all Exposure’s shortcut keys by finding it in the Help menu.

I’ll press the minus key to assign the reject flag. If I hold down the Shift key and press minus, Exposure automatically cycles to the next image in the grid.

I can go through the images one by one like that, or I view them in the Grid view to select multiple images. I’ll use the Ctrl key to select the ones I want to reject, then apply the reject flag to all of them simultaneously. Rejected photos are shown dimmed in the grid view.

After I’ve finished rejecting the ones I don’t want, I can then tell Exposure to hide the rejects so I’m only looking at candidates for editing.

Now I’ll use the star ratings to rate the remaining images.

I’ll do so in grid mode. I can rate them from the thumbnails. I’ll increase the thumbnail size so I can see them clearly. And I’ll use the 1 through 5 keys on my keyboard to assign star ratings.

If you prefer to view the images full sized when rating, you can do that too. Holding down the Shift key cycles through the images after you assign a rating.

Okay, so I’ve narrowed down the shoot. I’ll set Exposure’s filter to four stars and above.

I’m in the home stretch here. I’ve narrowed it down to a few images that I want to compare. Using Exposure’s Side-By-Side view comes in helpful here. I’ll switch to Fit view and select Vertical view. I’ll also activate the Link Views so I can pan and zoom both images at once. I’m looking to see which expression I like more.

I’ll go with this one.

The last thing I’ll do here is assign color labels to the rated images. It’s a helpful way of keeping track of images for different purposes. For this image, I’ll assign it a red color label for social media and internet uploads. I’ll assign a green color label to an image that I will print. If you’re working with lots of images for different purposes, having these five color labels really helps you quickly classify them.

You can see how efficient and easy it is to cull your work in Exposure. And you do all your work, both culling and editing, in one interface, so you can seamlessly transition between stages in your workflow.