Alien Skin Software https://www.alienskin.com Simple Tools. Simply Beautiful. Thu, 19 Jul 2018 19:46:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Creating Spot Color Effects in Exposure https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/creating-spot-color-effects-in-exposure/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/creating-spot-color-effects-in-exposure/#respond Thu, 19 Jul 2018 16:00:21 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26798 Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how to apply spot color effects to your photos in Exposure.

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Exposure’s advanced layers functionality and brush tool provide a great way to create spot color effects. Spot color or selective color is a powerful method for directing the viewer’s attention to the subject of a photo. Spot color converts a color photo to black and white, leaving a select area of the image with its original coloring.

Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how to create a powerful spot color effect in Exposure. We’ll show you how to convert your image to black and white, how to control the application of the effects with brushing, and more.

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Exposure X3 Workflow Webinar with Kevin Mullins https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/exposure-workflow-webinar-kevin-mullins/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/exposure-workflow-webinar-kevin-mullins/#comments Wed, 18 Jul 2018 14:00:32 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26764 Join us on July 26th at 5PM EDT for an Exposure X3 photo editing workflow with accomplished photographer Kevin Mullins. Kevin will be demonstrating his full workflow and answering questions. Space is limited, so sign up today.

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Exposure X3 photo editor app webinar

We’re pleased to announce our upcoming webinar with accomplished documentary wedding and family photographer Kevin Mullins, and we invite you to join us. On July 26th at 5PM EDT, Kevin will be walking us through his Fujifilm RAF editing workflow with Exposure X3, our advanced photo editor app. He’ll also be answering questions.

This is a great opportunity to see a talented professional photographer’s editing workflow in action, as well as see firsthand how Exposure can transform your photos.

We’ll be co-hosting this webinar with FujiLove, a community for Fujifilm enthusiasts. There will be a lot of useful information no matter what camera you use!

Sign up soon. The sign-up deadline is July 26th, 2PM EDT, and is limited to 500 participants.

Sign Up Here

To see Kevin’s award-winning work, visit his site.

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Split Toning in Exposure https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/split-toning-in-exposure/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/split-toning-in-exposure/#respond Tue, 17 Jul 2018 15:00:12 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26755 Watch our Split Toning video and learn how to apply split toning effects to your images in Exposure, and see how to control their effect and placement.

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Exposure’s split toning tools enable you to easily introduce color tone effects in your photos. They can be used to create emotion or to replicate vintage film processing techniques. Exposure’s robust selection of split toning presets provides you with quick access to toning effects like sepia or cyanotype, or you can create your own from scratch. You can easily experiment with different creative looks in Exposure, and you can build custom toning presets to make your workflow more efficient.

Watch our latest video and learn how to apply split toning effects on your images, how to control their effect and placement in your photos, and how to save your own versions for use in the future.

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Andrea Livieri’s Photo Makeover Workflow https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/andrea-livieri-photo-makeover-workflow/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/andrea-livieri-photo-makeover-workflow/#comments Tue, 10 Jul 2018 14:00:58 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26659 Andrea Livieri shares his photo makeover workflow from start to finish on a submitted RAW image from Carl Valiquet.

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Thank you to everyone who supported our photo makeover project by spreading the word and submitting photos. There were lots of excellent RAW images shared with us. As a quick recap of the project, we invited everyone to submit a RAW, unprocessed image for a chance to have it edited by portrait and landscape superstar photographer Andrea Livieri. In the article below, Andrea shares his full start-to-finish editing workflow on one of the submitted photos. Thanks for being part of this photo makeover Andrea, Carl, and everyone else who submitted!

Andrea’s Analysis and Advice

I chose to edit photographer Carl Valiquet’s DNG image. It was captured using a Leica M 240 camera, and an Elmarit-M f/2.8 21mm ASPH lens.

What first drew me to this photo was its excellent composition. All of the main elements in the image have a pleasing balance. I like the angled crescent shapes in the foreground. They create clear leading lines that direct the viewer’s eye into the center of the photo. These features of the image give it a strong presence. Additionally, the balanced composition and features give lots of opportunities to enhance the image with editing.

When shooting in a backlit situation like this, it’s important to consider how much detail the camera can capture before you take the shot. The shadows are exposed well in this photo, but the highlights don’t have as much crisp detail as they could. Shooting bracketed exposures, or using gradient filters would ensure that the camera can capture a higher amount of detail.

One thing to be aware of when you recover areas of missing details in a shot, like the sky in this photo, is that it’s critical that you don’t try to bring back all of that detail. Having some areas without detail in your image is okay. This is especially true it there is a bright highlight in a sun flare like this photo has. Recovering all the details can lead to the image’s tones reading muddy.

Original, unedited Image. Click for a larger view.

As I began editing this RAW photo, the first thing that I thought to use was Exposure’s layers functionality. Layers give me a lot of flexibility to make adjustments to each aspect of the effects I apply. Because this isn’t one of my images, I knew I would likely do more adjusting of each element of the look, so I wanted to build in as much flexibility as I could.

Click for a larger view.

  • The first thing I did was to remove distracting objects in the photo with the spot heal tool. There is a blue flag in the lower right corner that had to go. Also, on the Tone Curve panel, I raised the black point to give the image a faded feel, I decreased the white point to dial back the intense bright white glow on the sun, and I added a gentle ‘S’ curve to contrast.

Click for a larger view.

  • Next, I applied burning to the right corner of the sky using the Brush tool. I also increased clarity and added contrast to this layer. The combination of clarity and contrast gave a nice pop to clouds.
  • I added additional burning effects to the lower left and the lower right. These effects were applied in their own layers so I can manipulate them independently. The detail in both lower corners was a little too strong, so I brought the brightness down to help direct the viewer’s eye to the leading lines in the foreground.

Click for a larger view.

  • I then applied a Kodachrome 35mm (1936-1962) preset to the entire photo. The Kodachrome preset warmed up the color temperature, and it also enhanced the photo with some additional mood.
  • Next I added dodging effects to a few areas in the foreground. This was to help create more separation from the background. It also enhanced the leading lines on the left and balanced the highlights in the trees on the right.
  • I applied a second preset, Kodak Portra 160NC at a low opacity. This added a controlled, balanced contrast across the whole image and further enhanced the mood.

Click for a larger view.

  • I added some detailed dodge effects to the green in the leading lines. There were harsh shadows in a few spots. Removing those dark areas makes the leading lines read more clear.
  • In a new layer, I brought the mid tones down a touch to add a bit more density.
  • The region near the sun was a bit dull, so I used a local adjustment layer to pop up the sun and rebalance the zone where the sun shines brightly in the shot. I did this by raising the Whites slider and by lowering the Shadows slider.

Click for a larger view.

  • Next, I did a little burning to a bright section in the foreground of the shot. This was to remove a distracting bright area on the bottom edge of the photo.
  • In the next layer, I used the HSL panel controls to make the yellows more orange. I also increased the color saturation in those tones. This helped make the foreground more warm.
  • I added a second layer for the sun. I moved the white point left on the Tone Curve, and I dimmed the mid tones slightly.

Click for a larger view.

  • I added red coloring to the highlights using the Tone Curve. I increased the mid tones on the red curve slightly, and then I brought down the red channel highlights. On the blue channel curve, I slightly raised the mid tones and highlights.
  • I applied dodging to tame the reflection highlights. They easily overpowered the sun in the shot.
  • I also added a vignette. When I apply vignettes in Exposure, I like to turn the Amount slider very high so I can see the vignette effects easily. After that I will make adjustments to blend the vignette with the image, and then I decrease the amount until it looks right to my eye.

Lens flare before and after viewed at 200% magnification.

  • I added a layer to fix the lens flare. I needed to desaturate that small area significantly to blend it with the rest of the photo. This also makes the tones blend with the background.

I love working with moody landscape scenes, and this backlit shot is very nice to work with. Since it’s not one of my own images, I can’t use the same creative process that I do on my own work. I had to experiment because I didn’t know where to take the photo with editing. This is where Exposure excels. Experimenting with Exposure’s presets enable me to visualize what mood goes well with the image. This is one of the many aspects of the software that makes Exposure stand out as my go-to creative tool.

The final edited image. Click for a larger view.

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Photo Editing with Virtual Copies https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/photo-editing-with-virtual-copies/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/photo-editing-with-virtual-copies/#respond Thu, 05 Jul 2018 15:00:38 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26652 Our latest quick tip video shows how to use Exposure’s virtual copies to easily create multiple versions of your photos for different uses.

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Exposure’s virtual copies enable you to make multiple versions of your images without filling up your hard drive. Incorporating virtual copies in your workflow encourages more creative experimentation and is useful in lots of post-processing scenarios.

Watch our new video and learn how easy it is to work with virtual copies. We show you how to create multiple virtual copies of your photos cropped for different uses, and how to apply various looks to them.

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Black and White Portraits Photo Contest with GreyLearning https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/black-and-white-portraits-photo-contest-with-greylearning/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/black-and-white-portraits-photo-contest-with-greylearning/#respond Tue, 03 Jul 2018 15:00:05 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26635 Join our Black and White Portraits photo contest with GreyLearning on Facebook and Instagram. Use #blackandwhiteportraitsphotocontest, #alienskinphotocontest, and #alienskinexposure to enter. Submit before August 3rd.

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Our next photo contest is here! We are delighted to announce our Black and White Portraits photo contest. From now until midnight on August 3rd, you can submit your very best black and white portraits for a chance to win. The grand prize for this contest is a copy of our award-winning RAW photo editor Exposure X3 and a one-year subscription to GreyLearning.com.

How to Enter

  • Edit your best black and white portrait image in Exposure.

  • Post it to Facebook or Instagram with these three tags:

    • #alienskinphotocontest
    • #blackandwhiteportraitsphotocontest
    • #alienskinexposure
  • Submit your entries by August 3rd.

  • If you don’t own Exposure yet, you can use the free 30-day trial to create your contest entry.

Prizes

The grand prize is a copy of our advanced RAW photo editor Exposure X3 and a one-year subscription to GreyLearning’s Ultimate Bundle. The winning photo will be featured on our blog and all our social media channels.

Entries are judged based on originality, creativity, technical merit, and adherence to the contest theme.

A yearly subscription to the GreyLearning Ultimate Bundle gives you access to all of the educational content for photographers in the GreyLearning video training library. That includes 62 courses, in over 1,300 lessons, totaling over 100 hours of educational content.

Tim Grey is one of the top educators in digital photography and imaging. He teaches through photography workshops, seminars, and at photography events around the world. He’s known for offering clear guidance on complex subjects through his writing and speaking.

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Photo Makeover with Andrea Livieri https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/photo-makeover-with-andrea-livieri/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/photo-makeover-with-andrea-livieri/#respond Tue, 26 Jun 2018 15:00:30 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26589 Submit your RAW photo for a chance to have portrait and landscape photographer Andrea Livieri bring your work to life with Exposure.

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If you have ever wanted to see how an experienced pro would edit one of your images, this photo makeover project is just for you.

It is an excellent opportunity to learn more about bringing your work to life with Exposure’s editing capabilities. You are invited to submit a shot you’re proud of that you would like to see edited by accomplished portrait and landscape photographer Andrea Livieri. From now until July 2nd, we are accepting entries. All genres of photos are eligible.

How to Enter

Everyone is welcome to submit their work. To enter, simply include your favorite unedited RAW image via the form belowPlease provide your full name and an email address when you submit.

Good luck!

What happens to my photo?

We will feature the winning photo in the blog article that demonstrates the editing workflow. We’ll also share it on our social media channels where we mention the article. If your shot is chosen as the one we feature, we will share the final Exposure settings with you, so you can recreate the look, learn from it, and make modifications to have it match your style. Andrea will demonstrate the editing workflow right here on the blog in early July.

About Andrea Livieri

Andrea Livieri is an exceptional photographer, educator, musician, and a spirited adventurer. He started exploring the photography medium by capturing images of fellow musicians, their families, and other friends and acquaintances in the music industry. As he continued honing his craft, he merged his love for photography and exploring the outdoors, enabling him to amass lots of gorgeous photographic work of delightful scenery, rugged mountainscapes, and exhilarating terrain. He also leads workshops to teach other photographers his methods.

Andrea’s work has been published in Landscape Photography Magazine, Outdoor Photographer, Photo Plus Magazine, and Popular Photography, among others. You can learn more about him on his website, or follow him on Instagram or Facebook.

Why Andrea Uses Exposure

Andrea has been a long-time fan of Exposure.

“Ever since I began my career in photography I’ve processed every single portrait through Exposure. It has been one of my favorite post-processing tools since the first release when Exposure was a film simulation plugin for Photoshop. Exposure’s tools and presets give my work a look and feel that I can’t get elsewhere.”

Thank you for your interest, but the project is now closed.

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Creating an Ethereal Black and White Look https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/creating-an-ethereal-black-and-white-look/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/creating-an-ethereal-black-and-white-look/#respond Thu, 21 Jun 2018 15:00:42 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26583 Our latest Exposure quick tip video demonstrates how to create a compelling black and white infrared film effect from start to finish.

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Exposure has accurate emulations of analog B&W Infrared films that provide striking ethereal looks for your photos. The presets work great on their own, or they can be customized using Exposure’s full range of artistic tools. Applying a preset and then making editing adjustments on your image enables you to easily create a unique mood in your style.

Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how to transform a color shot into a stunning black and white with dream-like qualities. We’ll walk you through a technique for customizing an infrared look to emphasize atmospheric characteristics in your photos with delicate blurring, a ghostly glow in the highlights, and more.

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Blow Up Image Enlargement to the Rescue https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/blow-up-image-enlargement-to-the-rescue/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/blow-up-image-enlargement-to-the-rescue/#comments Tue, 19 Jun 2018 15:00:35 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26557 Raleigh-based wedding and portrait photographer Christopher Nieto recounts the times Blow Up’s crystal clear image resizing came to the rescue.

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With the gigantic sensors in today’s digital cameras, you’ll often find yourself searching for more hard drive space than you will enlarging photos. But there are times when photo enlarging can come in handyespecially for shots you can’t recreate. Unfortunately, increasing the size of a photo usually means a loss in quality. Blow Up is a great solution to tackle this problem. With Blow Up, your photos stay crystal clear during enlargement. In this article, Raleigh-based wedding and portrait photographer Christopher Nieto shares examples of how Blow Up came to the rescue when shoots didn’t go as planned.


Blow Up Rescued a Wedding Shoot

Before starting to shoot a wedding, I confirm my own gear and the gear with my second shooters to double-check all our camera settings are correct. I always want to capture the largest RAW images possible, so that’s the first thing I verify. Some camera systems have small and medium-sized RAW format options, which are easy to miss. The small size in particular doesn’t record a large enough file to do any cropping and still have a large enough file to print. It’s still RAW format, so it’s understandably easy to mistake as the proper format when you glance at the display window. That’s exactly what happened to my second shooter at this wedding.

The resolution difference between small, medium, and full-sized RAW images.

After the wedding, I returned home late at night and downloaded the cards. I thought something was going wrong with my computer because I wasn’t able to zoom in on some of the images, but I dismissed it thinking I was just tired from the day of shooting. The next morning I realized what happened. It was only my second shooter’s images that weren’t allowing me to zoom in because they shot small-sized RAWs. At that point, there was nothing I could do. I had to edit the event just like I would regularly.

I have been using Blow Up to enlarge photos for wedding albums for a number of years. Parents of the bride and groom often send baby pictures or a snapshot of someone’s grandparents to include in the wedding album. Blow Up always performed well when I used it on low-quality photos, so I knew it could handle it.

After the editing was complete, I ran the smaller photos through Blow Up to match their size with the others in the set. Enlarging a bunch of shots in batches makes the process quick, so it only lengthened my post-processing workflow by a few extra minutes. The software is deceptively easy to use. I simply typed in the size I wanted the photos to be and pressed OK. The best part about using Blow Up is the quality of the resized imagesit does a remarkably good job at keeping the images clear. The finals blended perfectly with the rest of the set, even though they’d been enlarged several times over. If I look back over the wedding today, I can’t tell which photos were resized and which ones weren’t.

Click to view full resolution image after it was resized with Blow Up.

…and then Another

A few months later, the same thing happened to me again. This time, the stakes were much higher. A local wedding vendor, who I’ve worked with plenty of times before, asked me to photograph their daughter’s wedding. There was a ton of pressure to perform well for this client. I booked a more experienced second shooter that I’ve worked with for over three years. I trusted that photographer much more, so I didn’t shoot extra to compensate for rookie mistakes. If I couldn’t use any of the images they took, there would have been a massive gap in coverage.

Click to view full resolution image after it was resized with Blow Up.

Once again, they had been shooting using the small RAW format, so the photos they delivered were only a fraction of the size I expected. Blow Up came to the rescue again, and it totally nailed it, like always. The wedding set turned out great! And no one can tell that some of the images were resized.

Click to view full resolution image after it was resized with Blow Up.

Blow Up Helped Rebuild a Client’s History

Not all my clients are celebrating the union of marriage. Later in the same year, I was contacted by a funeral home that had recently burned down. In the original building, there were prints hung on the walls of the owners and of their families from previous generations. The photographs ranged from the 20’s, 30’s, and all the way up to the current day.

Cell phone snap of original prints

The fire would have destroyed those memories, forever. Luckily, they found cell phone snaps of each of the photographs from the funeral home employees. I was able to clean up all the images, merge them, remove flash reflections, rebuild them, and then enlarge them to replace all the ruined prints. That client couldn’t be happier with how the enlargements turned out.

Blow Up greatly increased these small cell phone pics to be large enough to print at the same size as the originals.

I have been very pleased by the quality of the resizing effects since the first time I used Blow Up. It’s like magic. How is it even possible? Aside from the fabulous quality you get, one of the very best things about Blow Up is how easy it is to use. And it only takes seconds. I can process batches of images all at once, and it doesn’t slow me down. The speed of my editing workflow hasn’t changed much at all. It’s the perfect solution for all my image resizing needs. I tell photographers all the time to get Blow Up because eventually they will need it, and there’s nothing else out there that comes close to what it can do.


 

Thank you, Christopher for telling us about your experiences with Blow Up. You can learn more about him on his website, or follow him socially on Facebook and Instagram.

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Building Custom Brush Presets https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/building-custom-brush-presets/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/building-custom-brush-presets/#comments Tue, 12 Jun 2018 18:47:29 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26546 Our latest quick tip video demonstrates how to customize Exposure’s brush tool presets to fit your workflow.

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Exposure’s brush tool enables you to brush an effect on your photo selectively. Brush presets give quick access to effects like dodge and burn, clarity, and skin smoothing. Exposure ships with lots of useful brush presets, but you can create your own for specific editing needs. Building custom brush presets simplifies your editing workflow and makes you more efficient.

Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how to make a preset for painting texture on a plain backdrop, how to customize the effect to taste, and how to save brush presets for use in the future.

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An Update to Our Privacy Policy https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/an-update-to-our-privacy-policy/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/an-update-to-our-privacy-policy/#respond Thu, 07 Jun 2018 14:00:57 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26530 We have updated our privacy policy to better explain how we use your private data.

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The new GDPR privacy requirements have us thinking about consumer privacy, and how we handle your data. We’ve always been careful not to bother you without your consent, but now we have an opportunity to make our data policies clearer.

To that end, we’ve updated our privacy policy. You can always find a link to it in our site footer. We clarify what data we keep, how we use cookies, and how we use your data. Some of the policies in the document aren’t new. For example, we have never shared your information with third parties.

There’s a trend in the software industry toward better privacy and user consent policies. This is a good thing, and we applaud our European friends for leading the way on this. There’s a big responsibility in handling user data, and we realize that it’s good for both Alien Skin and our customers when we handle your data responsibly.

If you have any concerns about how your data is used, or if you wish to change your contact preferences, please let us know!

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Perfect Portrait Photo Contest Winner https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/perfect-portrait-photo-contest-winner/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/perfect-portrait-photo-contest-winner/#comments Wed, 06 Jun 2018 15:00:32 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26517 Portrait photographer Alejandra Dodge won the grand prize for our Perfect Portrait photo contest with FJ Westcott.

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This is the winning submission of our Perfect Portrait photo contest with FJ Westcott. Congratulations to Alejandra Dodge from Lubbock, Texas! The grand prize for the contest is a copy of our advanced RAW editor Exposure X3 and a gift card from Westcott worth $250. Alejandra submitted her photo by including the contest hashtags #alienskinphotocontest, #perfectportraitphotocontest, and #alienskinexposure.

You can participate in our next photo contest by submitting your work with the new contest hashtags on Instagram and Facebook. We will make announcements on all our channels when our next contest begins. Keep watch here on the blog for more details.

Winner

Alejandra is a Venezuelan photographer who moved to America in 2013. She met her husband through Flickr while she was still living in Venezuela. When in Venezuela, Alejandra worked as a professional food photographer for chefs and restaurants, but her passion and focus was on portrait photography. Now she mainly operates out of her home studio in Texas, and she devotes her time to developing her skills at creating fantastic portraiture.

About the Winning Photo

We asked Alejandra about how she created her entry. She said, “For this image, I used Exposure to get the color balance I wanted. Before I started using Exposure, balancing skin tones was hard to get just right. With Exposure, I feels like I can get the exact skin tones I envision. I am very impressed with Exposure. It’s inspired me to revisit some of my older work and update my editing style. And I’m having a blast doing it! I am still learning Exposure’s capabilities, but it has really made my workflow easier and it lets me achieve the exact look I’m after.”

Runners-up

The photographers of these excellent images below also win a copy of our advanced, non-destructive RAW photo editor Exposure X3. Terrific work, everyone who entered!

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25th Anniversary Celebration Interview with New Exposure User Tomash Trzebiatowski https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25th-anniversary-celebration-tomash-trzebiatowski-interview/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25th-anniversary-celebration-tomash-trzebiatowski-interview/#respond Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:00:46 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26432 As part of our 25th anniversary celebration, we interviewed Fujifilm photographer and FujiLove Magazine founder Tomash Trzebiatowski, who recently began using Exposure to replace his Lightroom workflow.

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As part of our 25th anniversary celebration, we decided to interview two kinds of Exposure users: a long-time user who has been with us from the start, and a newer one who recently began using Exposure. This interview is with a photographer who discovered Exposure fairly recently. Tomash Trzebiatowski is a Fujifilm photographer and the editor and creator of FujiLove Magazine. He is also an avid user of Exposure, and has replaced his Lightroom workflow with an Exposure workflow.

Why did you replace your Lightroom workflow with an Exposure workflow?

There were a few main reasons for making this decision. The three most important ones are the wonderful rendering of Fujifilm RAF files, the excellent built-in black and white presets (and I love black and white photography!), and Exposure’s speed. I love the fact that I can copy hundreds of images from my memory card so quickly and immediately be able to look at the previews. What I also love about Exposure is the way it “organizes” my image files. There is no need for a huge, main catalogue file. I simply store my images on an external hard drive, I connect it to my desktop or to my laptop (when on the go), launch Exposure, and I am ready to edit immediately.

How significant a factor was product reliability and company reputation in your decision to switch to Exposure? Did knowing that Alien Skin has been creating award-winning editing apps since 1993 play a role in your decision?

I was aware of the existence of Alien Skin Photoshop plugins, but I have to admit that I kind of “rediscovered” Exposure just in the end of 2017. I was so impressed with its standalone version that I immediately started exploring its features. I copied the first batch of my Fujifilm files into it and started working. I was hooked. I immediately felt at home. Everything in Exposure felt intuitive and logical. And, of course, I loved the results I was achieving with my photographs.

How do you use Exposure to handle the organizing steps of your workflow? Has it made it easier for you to cull and organize your images?

Culling and organizing is a breeze. I copy the images, go through them very quickly, mark them with stars, or reject those I want to get rid of. Next, I erase rejected images from my hard drive. And then I start editing! I also love the fact that I don’t even have to switch between any panels to accomplish all this.

What are your favorite creative tools in Exposure?

Needless to say, I love the presets. So often they are the starting point for my edits and so often I do not need much more. A few simple adjustments and I am usually very happy with the results.

Are there any features in Exposure that make it uniquely suited for processing Fujifilm RAF files?

I think that the initial rendering of Fujifilm RAF files is excellent. Details, contrast, dynamic range, colors – everything seems to be looking just right “straight out of the box.”

What’s your advice to other photographers who are considering switching to a Lightroom alternative?

Go ahead and download the free trial. I have the feeling you will really like it. I have been using Lightroom for many years and – don’t get me wrong – I still think that it is an excellent application, but personally, using Exposure feels smoother to me. It makes editing even more enjoyable and the entire experience feels more like being in a real darkroom. It is difficult to describe. It is a powerful mixture of excellent software features, user interface, and the way of rendering Fujifilm files. I am looking forward very much to what the future brings and how Exposure will grow with every update.


Thanks to Tomash for taking the time for this interview. To view his work, visit his site. Visit FujiLove to learn more about the Fuji X community.

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25th Anniversary Celebration Interview with Long-time Exposure User Tony Sweet https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25th-anniversary-celebration-tony-sweet-interview/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25th-anniversary-celebration-tony-sweet-interview/#respond Sun, 03 Jun 2018 14:00:54 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26383 As part of our 25th anniversary celebration, we interviewed acclaimed landscape photographer Tony Sweet, a long-time user of Exposure, to get his thoughts on his many years using the product.

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As part of our 25th anniversary celebration, we decided to interview two kinds of Exposure users: a long-time user who has been with us from the start, and a newer one who recently began using Exposure. This interview is with acclaimed photographer, instructor, and Nikon “Legend Behind the Lens” Tony Sweet. Tony has used Exposure since its first release. Tony’s work is represented by Getty Images, and he has published numerous books on landscape photography and photo editing.

How did you first learn about Alien Skin Software?

That is a very long time ago. Back when plugins were popping up every few months, I was attracted to the different capabilities in Alien Skin’s suite of filters.

What initially attracted you to Exposure?

Alien Skin was the first to introduce the ability to add bokeh to an image after the fact without being a photoshop guru. And Snap Art was well crafted and interesting, adding another dimension to creative image processing. These two plugins altered my way of thinking and creating at the computer as well as pre-visualizing the final effect after adding an effect.

What initially attracted me to Exposure was being able to move easily between Color and B&W workflows, the inclusion of textures and borders, as well as the inclusion of Bokeh.

What sets Exposure apart in your mind from other photo editors?

  • Having the ability to seamlessly move between layers, which are set up quickly and easily when selecting an adjustment
  • Having the ability to modify and add/subtract/modify adjustments to any layer instantly
  • Having all of the adjustments are at your fingertips
  • Exposure is very easy to navigate
  • Being able to easily and quickly go back in the history panel
  • Doing a great deal of texturing, being able to easily import and see the textures by live scrolling through the textures is outstanding, as well as assigning the blend mode upon import, then easily changing if desired

Do you have any favorite looks or edits that you rely on Exposure to achieve?

I approach each image with a fresh look, even when re-processing an image. I like the variation rather than replicating the exact same look. This probably comes from my jazz musician background.

Does your Exposure workflow differ for your landscape and your flower images?

I’m more inclined to add textures and bokeh with flowers, like any other portrait. Landscapes are a bit more literal, where I’m more concerned with color/contrast punch for visual impact.

If you’ve created any custom presets or textures in Exposure, can you describe them?

I seldom use presets as I prefer to find my own way through the image process to create what I am seeing in my imagination, which most certainly involves a little trial and error and experimentation. However, presets are an excellent way to get a jump start on image processing. Presets can also be altered to taste.

How has your use of Exposure changed over the years?

As the software has evolved, the workflow has become easier, quicker, and more intuitive.


Thanks to Tony for taking the time for this interview. To view his work, visit his site.

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A Brief History of Exposure https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/a-brief-history-of-exposure/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/a-brief-history-of-exposure/#comments Sat, 02 Jun 2018 14:00:29 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26400 As part of our 25th-anniversary celebration, look through the historical archives of Exposure’s evolution since its first release.

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As part of our 25th anniversary celebration, let’s look back through the history of our award-winning advanced photo editor and organizer, Exposure. It has evolved a great deal since its first release. We’ll show you how each release brought it closer to the amazing photo editor you know and love today.

2005: Exposure

We launched Exposure as an all-new plug-in for Adobe Photoshop that brought the look and feel of film to digital photography. It enabled photographers to recapture the look of analog film, which had previously been impossible to do in a digital workflow. The first release featured our first batch of film presets, grain, color toning, and even cross-processing.

2007: Exposure 2

A primary focus of Exposure 2 was adding new film emulations. Many photographers lent their expertise and shared samples of their favorite films so we could add them to the product.

  • More presets – now there are more than 200
  • Auto grain size
  • Expanded grain controls
  • Enhanced presets organization
  • Photoshop Smart Filter support
  • Improved Infrared simulations

2010: Exposure 3

Exposure 3 was all about tight integration with Adobe tools. In this version, we introduced support for Lightroom and added 64-bit support for compatibility with Photoshop CS5.

  • Even more presets! Exposure 3 shipped with over 500.
  • Lightroom support
  • 64-bit multithreaded processing
  • New vignette tool
  • Expanded dust and scratches

2012: Exposure 4

Speed and ease of use were the main goals of Exposure 4. In this version, the separate B&W and color filters were combined for the first time.

  • Preset hover preview
  • Texture effects
  • Color channel controls
  • Black and White color filter ability
  • Split toning

2013: Exposure 5

We introduced Exposure as a standalone app in version 5, allowing users to run it without Photoshop or Lightroom.

  • Visual preset browser
  • Hide/Reveal panels
  • New controls for overlays
  • New textures

2014: Exposure 6

We completely integrated Bokeh, our creative focus plug-in, into Exposure 6, along with major improvements to the user interface design.

  • Basic control panel
  • Full-sized previews
  • Syncing presets via cloud

2014: Exposure 7

We redesigned the user interface in Exposure 7 for lightning-fast file browsing, making photo management simple.

  • Crop and rotate
  • Full-featured file browser
  • Updated split toning presets
  • More texture overlays
  • New Color film presets
  • New B&W film presets

2015: Exposure X

We transformed Exposure into a complete photo editor with the release of version X. New photo organization tools, greatly expanded RAW camera support, and more editing options were the theme of this release.

  • White balance eyedropper
  • Tint and Temp sliders
  • Sharpening
  • Noise reduction
  • Brush tool
  • Configurable interface elements
  • Multiple monitor support

2016: Exposure X2

Our efforts for version X2 focused on further expanding Exposure’s photo organizing and editing capabilities.

  • Spot Heal tool
  • Histogram
  • History panel
  • Metadata search
  • File renaming and image resizing options on Export
  • Support for PSD format images
  • Lens distortion correction

2017: Exposure X2 Advanced Layers Update

The Exposure X2 Advanced Layers Update was a free update that added a full-featured layering system to Exposure.

  • User-definable quick export recipes
  • High DPI monitor support
  • New file naming and destination export options
  • Manual lens correction

2017: Exposure X3

Exposure X3 featured new photo organizing and editing tools that further enabled it to function as the central app in a photography workflow.

  • Virtual copies
  • Keywords
  • Collections
  • Side-by-side view
  • Linear and Gradient tools

2018: Exposure X3 Complete Workflow Update

The Exposure X3 Complete Workflow Update was a free update that incorporated user feedback and refined the tools that we added in X3.

  • Hue, saturation, and luminance controls per color
  • Expanded keywords and collections abilities
  • Temp controls in Kelvin
  • Printing

Conclusion

Thanks for taking this trip through Exposure’s timeline with us. We’re committed to continuing to make Exposure the fastest way to bring your vision to life. We appreciate your wonderful support over the years, and we hope you’ll join us for the rest of the journey!

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25 Year Alien Skin Software Retrospective https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25-year-alien-skin-software-retrospective/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/25-year-alien-skin-software-retrospective/#comments Fri, 01 Jun 2018 14:00:23 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26356 Take a look back through the history of Alien Skin Software as we celebrate 25 years in business.

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This year marks the 25th anniversary of Alien Skin Software! A big milestone like that is an opportunity to look back on our history. We thought you might enjoy hearing the story of how we got where we are today.

Our Founder

Alien Skin’s founder, Jeff Butterworth, dropped out of computer science graduate school because he was interested in creating finished software products that helped people with real work. He noticed people struggling to use Adobe Photoshop. In those days it lacked many useful features people take for granted today. Jeff created Eye Candy, one of the first commercial Photoshop plug-ins, to replace long recipes for special effects.

Garage Startup Days

The early days at Alien Skin were a typical garage startup story. Jeff started with no money. His family thought he was crazy for dropping out of school, and wouldn’t invest in the business. He worked out of his apartment, using his roommate’s computer during the day to write the software. He wore a lot of hats – programming, taking orders, shipping packages, duplicating floppy disks, assembling manuals, and designing ads. His roommate’s cat would occasionally barf on invoices.

Listening and Learning

At first, Jeff didn’t know anything about running a business or making commercial software. He learned by talking to experienced people. He was surprised by how generous people were with their knowledge if you simply ask and listen carefully. He learned how to do press relations by talking to reporters. Even many competitors were happy to share their knowledge. We have always devoted real humans to tech support so we could learn from our customers. Our best product ideas came from customer suggestions.

The Transition to Digital Photography

In 2003, we had several conversations with customers who asked for a plug-in that would recreate the look of film. At first we wondered why people needed it, but after studying a lot of film photos, we learned that film selection was a creative choice that had a lot of impact on the look of a photo. We hadn’t seen these styles in digital photography and were inspired to bring them to modern workflows. This was the beginning of Exposure, which we created with the help of a lot of helpful photographers.

Exposure

Since I took over leadership of the company in 2013, Exposure has grown into our biggest product and is our main focus today. Over its lifetime, it has grown into a full-fledged raw editing solution, but its film emulation engine lives on at the core of the product. We’re continuing to listen to our customers as we add new features, and are committed to making Exposure the best photo editor available.

Thank You

Many thanks to our loyal customers for taking this journey with us. We are looking forward to the next 25 years!

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Fujifilm Presets in Exposure X3 https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/fujifilm-presets-in-exposure-x3/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/fujifilm-presets-in-exposure-x3/#comments Thu, 24 May 2018 14:00:48 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26362 Photographer Michael Gillman compares Exposure’s Fujifilm Simulation presets with Fujifilm in-camera effects.

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Fujifilm simulations. For those of us who shoot Fujifilm, it’s probably one of the main reasons we do so. I love the great color science that Fuji brings to the table with their decades of knowledge and experience from the film days. Provia, Astia, and Velvia give great filmic color tones while PRO Neg. Std and Pro Neg. HI give great skin tones.

Even back when I shot with Nikon, I was always impressed with the colors Fuji shooters got from JPEGs. It was late last year that I ultimately made the switch from Nikon to Fuji and have been enjoying those great Fujifilm simulations ever since.

A recent update by Alien Skin added several of these great in-camera simulations to Exposure X3’s list of presets. Being an avid Exposure user, I was excited to see that these new presets have been incorporated. In addition, the great thing about using these presets is that I can tweak them once applied to get the exact look I am going for.

Click to view image at a larger size

While there are several Fujifilm presets and preset variations to choose from in Exposure, I’m going to take a look at some of my favorite presets here that are listed in the Fujifilm Simulation folder pictured above. Just a note: The in-camera JPEG shots are displayed with factory settings and are not adjusted in the camera settings menu, (shadows/highlights/etc.). All photos in this article were shot with the Fujifilm X-T2.

Provia In-camera JPEG

The image above is a JPEG shot straight from the camera. This was shot with the in-camera Provia film simulation. I really like Provia as it works well in almost any situation. It’s not over-saturated, but still gives great tones and colors. It doesn’t really add much contrast to the scene, so it works well should you want to adjust the shadows and highlights a bit.

Exposure X3 Provia Std Preset

This is the same shot, but with Exposure’s Provia Std preset applied to the RAW file, which as you can see, looks similar to the in-camera JPEG. This preset gives you similar overall tones with the same great colors, but not overly saturated. It offers nearly the same level of contrast as well.

Astia In-camera JPEG

Astia is great choice for portraits in that it renders nice, soft skin tones. It’s a little less saturated than Provia, but still has a great color profile. Pictured above is an in-camera JPEG straight from the camera. The skin looks nice and soft.

Exposure X3 Astia Soft Preset

The shot above uses Exposure’s version of Fujifilm’s Astia film preset, which as you can see, like Provia, it looks very similar to what you would get inside the camera. They’ve really knocked it out of the park with this one! It looks fantastic. Same great skin tones and colors within this preset with very little image editing done other than just applying the preset and adding a sun flare overlay.

Exposure’s Overlays panel is located on the right. For this particular shot, I added the Corner 1 light effect overlay in the Sun Flare collection. You can also adjust the strength and opacity of the effect to your liking with the controls on this panel. Additionally, I set the Protect Location and adjusted the slider to control how much of the image the overlay affected.

Black and White Presets

For the next example, I wanted to start off with a Provia photo straight from the camera and then apply a black and white film preset to show the contrast between the two images. I really tend to favor the Fuji Neopan 1600 preset for a lot of black and white photos given Exposure’s amazing grain science. Just a note: The FujiFilm Simulation folder does not contain these particular presets. There are several variations of Fuji Neopan 1600 available in Exposure. The easiest way to find them is by using the text search at the top of the preset panel.

Exposure Fuji Neopan 1600 Preset

As you can see in the photo above, this preset produces great black and white tones and adds some fantastic looking grain to the image, being especially apparent in the clouds. Even if my intention is to print an image in color, I find myself applying this preset to many landscape and street photography images during editing just to see what it looks like.

Speaking of Printing

While a little off topic and before we get to our next example, I’d like to mention printing the images after applying Exposure presets. I bring this up now directly after the Fuji Neopan 1600 example because I wanted to make a print with this preset that I had applied to a lighthouse photo I had recently taken. So often we look at our images on a screen of some sort, be it a phone or laptop/desktop, but those images don’t always make it to print to see what they actually look like on paper.

With that, I decided to print this lighthouse image out with the same Fuji Neopan 1600 preset. I also applied minor adjustments to the image on the basic panel. The printed image turned out great. The tones and the grain look amazing on paper!

Velvia In-camera JPEG

This film simulation really punches up the colors and contrasts. While I do use Velvia during sunset photos and the occasional landscape, I generally won’t use it for portraits. Let’s take a look at the in-camera Velvia JPEG. In this photo, I feel it works well with the beautiful greenery that Hawaii has to offer. My intent for this photo was to emphasize the bare, white tree in the middle of the scene. Velvia works well for this situation because it really brings out the colors and adds quite a bit of contrast.

Exposure X3 Fuji Sim Velvia Vivid Preset

This is Exposure’s Fuji Sim Velvia preset added to the RAW file. It takes the contrast and color a step further as you can see. The greens are boosted as is the contrast. Of course, if this is a little too strong to your liking, all it takes is a small adjustment to the saturation or contrast sliders to bring the image back down to levels that may be more pleasing to your eyes.

Many More Options

In closing, I’d like to mention that there are several more Fujifilm preset options in Exposure, as well as plenty outside of Fujifilm, which vary in tones, overlays, borders, and effects. As mentioned, once applied, they can be modified further using Exposure’s editing panels. There are a lot of possibilities to be had using these presets.

Exposure X3 takes what I love about shooting Fujifilm JPEGs and experimenting with different in-camera film simulations and expands it even more by offering many great-looking variations of those presets, as well as many of Exposure’s standard Fujifilm presets matching closely to what I get in camera.

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Adding Metadata Info to Your Watermarks https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/adding-metadata-info-to-your-watermarks/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/adding-metadata-info-to-your-watermarks/#respond Tue, 22 May 2018 15:29:07 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26349 Indicate how you captured the shot by incorporating image metadata in your photo watermarks. Learn how to add more to your watermarks in our latest Exposure Quick Tip video.

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Exposure’s flexible watermarks enable you to render text or graphics on a photo when printing or exporting. You can add more than a photo copyright or your business logo in Exposure watermarks. You can also display image metadata such as ISO, focal length, camera model, and more.

Watch our latest quick tip video to learn how to build a watermark that includes these camera settings, how to save it as a custom preset for use in the future, and how to apply your new watermark during the export process.

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Using Exposure’s Film Presets to Tell Your Subject’s Story https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/using-exposures-film-presets-to-tell-your-subjects-story/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/using-exposures-film-presets-to-tell-your-subjects-story/#comments Thu, 17 May 2018 15:00:41 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26316 Dana Goldstein uses Exposure’s film presets to help her portraits express a complete, authentic story about her subject and their creative environment.

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My curiosity for people helps me get to know my portrait subjects personally. Building this strong connection with them translates into photos that have an authentic, natural feel. My fondness for creative environments has led me to take on an ongoing project named ‘Creative Workspaces,’ where I profile artists of various disciplines in their studios. The article below discusses how Exposure’s presets help my photos tell a complete story about my subjects and their creative environment.

Shake any Fujifilm photographer awake at 3 a.m. and ask him or her why they choose to shoot with Fuji, and they will invariably respond dreamily, “The colors… Oh the Fuji colors…” But there’s more to it than just “color,” isn’t there? I’d like to talk with you about how I see the role of color (and sometimes, its absence) in photography, and why I use Exposure in all my work. This isn’t about workflow per se. Let’s discuss, instead, the “why” of Exposure in the digital darkroom. I’ll share examples from two recent shoots from an ongoing personal project as well, shot on the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium format, along with the “why” behind my choices of film emulation for each of them.

As photographers, we constantly strive to express not merely how it looked, but how it felt. A slow shutter speed can help us communicate the blur of constant motion on a Manhattan street corner, or the sense of peace on a still pond. We use light to emphasize the lines of wisdom on an elderly face, or to wrap a bride in the glow of love. Our color palette is just as powerful a tool in this expression, and this is where Exposure comes in.

Think about the last lens you purchased. You probably solicited opinions online, such as fellow photographers on FujiLove’s page. You searched by lens on 500px. You read reviews. You watched YouTube videos. You got a sense of who was using the lens most, and under what circumstances it shone. In other words, you did serious research. Exposure’s emulations are a lot like that: you’ll see familiar names, and you’ll also be introduced to new ones. Go deeper with an emulation that catches your eye and look it up: What time frame was it in use? Is it strongly identified with a particular style of photography? Is there a Simon & Garfunkel song about it?

Do you know one of the most important tools we have as visual creators? The power of daydreaming. Now there are fancy terms for this, such as previsualization — we used to just call this “being prepared” — having a mental sketch of what we hope to create. I believe this process extends past the shoot itself, right into the digital darkroom, and for me, Exposure is essential to it.

Before I make my selects, before I begin adjusting any sliders, I take a little walk through the possibilities that the software offers me. It soon becomes clear that certain stocks just weren’t meant for certain images, and that’s fine. Inevitably, a few candidates emerge, the ones that I recognize as how it felt. I’m a big fan of Exposure’s “Audition Presets” feature, which allows me to compare up to six emulations of the same image against each other, helping me narrow down to my final choice.

Click image to view larger

And while I have returned to certain emulations many times (and reference them in my Favorites collection), by no means do I limit myself to them or feel as though I “have” to use them to maintain a consistent style. Photographic style includes many things: how you approach your subject, lighting, composition, lens choice, as well as the color or black & white palette. Your style can be expressed in many palettes, each one appropriate to its subject. I don’t shoot every subject with one formula, and I’m sure you don’t either. The many options in Exposure widen my view of the possibilities. From there, I have complete freedom to add, change, or remove grain; change tonal values; adjust the colors of the shadows and highlights; etc. With the recently-release Complete Workflow Update, the program, and how I use it, has only gained in flexibility and precision in both artistic (fine color detailing) and practical (keywording and metadata) features.

Now let’s look at a couple of examples of shoots from a project I’m working on, an editorial series on artists in their workspaces. As I’m based in the Hudson Valley area of upstate New York, I’ve been able to reach out to many working artists in the thriving creative communities that the region is famous for.

The minute I walked into metal and woodwork artist Randolph SanMillan’s basement studio, I knew that I wanted my final images to be in black & white. The strategically- but dimly-lit space created expressive shadows on the varied surfaces of SanMillan’s pieces, and the bronze pieces in particular glowed. I set my Fujifilm GFX 50S to Acros simulation, to help me concentrate on only the play of shadow and light in the EVF. Though I shoot in RAW, I find the Fujifilm simulations very helpful guides as I’m working. As we shot, we had a wonderful discussion of how he created his artwork, his influences, and what he intended to communicate with the pieces.

Later as I began my “daydreaming” in Exposure, I thought about the straightforward yet profound man of strong convictions I had just met. I’m a very big fan of French photographer Robert Doisneau (1912-1994), who photographed the daily laborers of modest means with whom he shared both social background and philosophy. In particular, his work in the now-demolished Parisian market district of Le Halles is a touchstone of ordinary people presented with dignity and grace. I wanted my images of SanMillan to share this quality.

While I’ve often used Exposure’s Pantomic-X black & white emulation, this time I was looking for something with a bit of a glow to the highlights, a fine grain, and a more cinematic feel. Scrolling, I landed on T-Max 100, and there it was: how it felt. The heroic, silvery quality that T-Max provides is an important part of why I consider this set of final images so successful.

As I pulled away from the home and studio of ceramist and sculptor Marie Mastronardo, I wasn’t sure that I’d quite nailed it. At age 86, she lives in what she concedes is a “half-finished” home that she has shared since the early 1970’s with the enormous artistic output of six decades. She had recently enjoyed a major retrospective of her career, which included an association with the renowned Art Students League in New York during the 1950’s.

The pieces that had returned to her cement studio were everywhere. Windowless and fluorescent-lit, the studio did not lend itself to photography, or to showing individual pieces effectively. Yet, as we spoke, I saw a life at the center of the art world, when New York had become the haven for a generation of European artists escaping the Nazis. Despite the cement and cold light inside, how it felt was warm and soothing: she was surrounded by the figures she had created and the memories of what had led to them.

This time, my “daydreaming” turned to a photographer of artists: Alexander Liberman (1912-1999), the artistic director of Vogue and later, over all of Condé Nast publications. His seminal volume The Artist in His Studio visits the preserved homes and studios of the Impressionists, as well as artists working into the 1950’s and ’60’s. Shot over decades, the images reflect the artists as individuals comfortably at home in their creative environments, much as Marie is in hers. In Mastronardo’s images, I wanted to emphasize the textures and warm base colors of her clays, and the wisdom in her expression, which my GFX 50S had captured in medium format detail and tonal range.

To my surprise, the Exposure emulation that suited this perfectly was one I’d never given a second thought: Ansco’s GAF 500. A color slide film known for extremely large and colorful grain, it was considered a rough, poor stepchild to the more finely grained films being used for 1960’s fashion work. This changed when French photographer Sarah Moon (b. 1941) began using it for such clients as Cacharel and the Pirelli Tires calendar. Its preternatural warmth gave her work an ethereal quality. Applied to my images, GAF 500 brought out the warm tones of the sculptures while not “colorizing” the cement studio surrounding them. The contrast of warm and cool was preserved. I removed the famous GAF grain, however, in order to keep the detail in the finished artwork. It was the right choice for this shoot, and Exposure’s grain engine made it possible to style it to my needs. The final images express both the artist, and the art.

I hope these examples encourage you to explore Exposure for yourself — for the first time, or with new eyes. Embrace the history of our amazing medium, and let this program help you fulfill your goal: to express how it felt.

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Quickly Compare Exposure Presets https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/quickly-compare-exposure-presets/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/quickly-compare-exposure-presets/#comments Thu, 10 May 2018 14:00:36 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26308 Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how you can quickly compare multiple presets side-by-side using Exposure’s preset audition ability.

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Exposure’s preset audition enables you to visually compare up to six presets at once. This ability makes it easy to quickly find the perfect look for your images. It’s especially helpful for comparing presets from the same family, such as Exposure’s variations of film emulations like Kodachrome, or Fuji Pro.

Watch our latest quick tip video to learn how it works. We show you how to enable audition mode, change the number of comparison images, select and swap auditioned presets, and more.

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Perfect Portrait Photo Contest with Westcott https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/perfect-portrait-photo-contest-with-westcott/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/perfect-portrait-photo-contest-with-westcott/#comments Tue, 08 May 2018 15:00:28 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26290 Join our Perfect Portrait photo contest with Westcott on Facebook and Instagram. Use #perfectportraitphotocontest, #alienskinphotocontest, and #alienskinexposure to enter. Submit before June 1st.

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We are excited to announce our next photo contest! From now until June 1st, our Perfect Portrait photo contest is open for entries. Submit your very best perfect portraits for a chance to win a copy of Exposure X3 and a $250 gift card for any product on the Westcott website.

How to Enter

  • If you don’t already own Exposure, download a free 30-day trial

  • Edit your best “perfect portrait” image in Exposure

  • Post it to Facebook or Instagram with these three tags

    • #alienskinphotocontest
    • #perfectportraitphotocontest
    • #alienskinexposure
  • Submit your entries by June 1st

Prizes

Join the contest and you could win the grand prize, a copy of our advanced RAW photo editor Exposure X3 and a $250 gift card good for any product from Westcott. Additionally, the winning photo will be featured on our blog and all our social media channels.

Images that use the Perfect Portrait theme will have the best chances of winning. Entries are judged based on originality, creativity, technical merit, and adherence to the contest theme.

Westcott is a leading innovator of photo and video lighting solutions for professionals and enthusiasts. Visit their YouTube channel for lots of great how-to videos, lessons in lighting essentials, and plenty of tips from top pro photographers and filmmakers. Learn more about Westcott’s lighting gear by visiting their website.

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Our Thoughts on Customer Service https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/our-thoughts-on-customer-service/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/our-thoughts-on-customer-service/#comments Fri, 04 May 2018 15:00:43 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26276 One of Alien Skin Software’s core goals is to provide the best experience for each of our customers. We take pride in our customer service being fast, friendly, and human.

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We’re committed to giving great customer service at Alien Skin Software. In our 25 years in the software industry, we’ve observed how much better life is when you can easily get help from a friendly human. Because of that, we’ve put a lot of time and thought into how we can give great customer support. This has paid off in amazing customer satisfaction. Here’s our rating for the last 30 days:


The core of good service is helpful people. Nate Zellmer is the leader of our tech support team. If you’ve opened a ticket recently, chances are you talked to him. He excels at solving tough technical problems quickly. He also brings customer feature requests to our development team so we can prioritize them in future updates. Mary Gukelberger and Robert Lounsberry also handle customer support, handling tickets when Nate is busy or out of the office.

Customer service doesn’t end with our support team. Our development team often steps in to help with technical troubleshooting, and our marketing team answers a lot of customer questions on social media.

Another element of good service is tools and technology. We use a ticketing system to track the details of every customer service interaction. This assures that no request for help gets forgotten. Our tickets track all of the discussion about a particular incident, so we never waste your time asking the same question twice.

We have several self-service features that are great if you need help outside our business hours. Nate has to sleep sometime! You can recover your license codes in case you lose track of them using our automated system. And, we have a support website with articles on common issues.

Great customer service is a core goal at Alien Skin Software, and is one of the things that sets us apart from our competitors. We take a lot of pride in giving the best service in the photography software world. I’ll leave you with a few recent quotes from satisfied customers.

“I shouldn’t be surprised that the customer service is first rate because the software you market is among the very best out there.” – Eric Berendt

“I am always amazed at the rapid and accurate help I receive from Alien Skin. The product is wonderful, and their help is unprecedented in my experience.” – Judith Grose

“I was called at home, and the knowledgeable technician told me exactly what to do to remedy the situation. I will buy more products from Alien Skin because of this.” – Jim Meraglia

“Excellent service! In fact, the very best customer service of any company I deal with. They have fast response time, act professional, and they give you the answer you need every time. Alien Skin is the BEST!” – Alicia Fucles

“Alien Skin remains one of my favorite software companies and this type of service is one of the reasons why!” – Ray Toler

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Building a Stunning Orange and Teal Look in Exposure https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/building-a-stunning-orange-and-teal-look-in-exposure/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/building-a-stunning-orange-and-teal-look-in-exposure/#comments Mon, 30 Apr 2018 17:17:24 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26264 This tutorial video demonstrates techniques for building a custom Exposure preset with a beautiful orange and teal look.

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Emphasizing the colors orange and teal is a look used by some Hollywood movies. Color grading with complementary hues can enhance color contrast in your work and give your images more punch.

Watch our new Orange and Teal video and learn how to build your own Exposure preset with a cinematic feel. This is an update of a previous video. We updated it because the new color adjustment sliders that we added in the Exposure X3 Complete Workflow Update give you a powerful and even easier way to accomplish this effect.

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Image Edit Copy Options in Exposure https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/image-edit-copy-options-in-exposure/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/image-edit-copy-options-in-exposure/#respond Fri, 27 Apr 2018 18:49:48 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26260 Watch our latest quick tip video and learn how you can reuse adjustments you’ve made to a photo using Exposure’s ability to copy and paste image edits.

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Exposure’s ability to copy and paste image edits is a great way reuse adjustments you’ve made to a photo. This saves you from having to start the editing process from scratch on each image.

Watch our latest quick tip video to learn how to copy and paste your photo edits. We’ll show you how to quickly choose which adjustments to copy to the clipboard, and how to apply them to other photos.

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Exposure X3 Feature Improvements and Expanded RAW Support https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/exposure-x3-feature-improvements-and-expanded-raw-support/ https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2018/exposure-x3-feature-improvements-and-expanded-raw-support/#comments Thu, 19 Apr 2018 17:27:14 +0000 https://www.alienskin.com/?p=26254 We’ve released several minor updates to Exposure X3 that include feature enhancements such as new export workflow options, expanded camera and lens support, and more.

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We have released several minor updates to Exposure X3 since the release of the Complete Workflow Update last month. These updates are free to anyone who owns Exposure X3.

You can check to see if you have the latest version of Exposure right in the program. Choose Check for Updates from the Help menu. If an update is available, Exposure will provide you with a link to download the update installer.

Feature Improvements

Included in the latest updates are several feature enhancements:

  • Live font preview for text and metadata watermarks
  • Improved visibility of the vignette placement indicator
  • A new option to choose your export folder destination at the time of export
  • Creation time of exported photos now matches the original image capture time
  • Performance optimization for large keyword libraries
  • Stability improvements

Camera Support

The updates add support for these cameras:

  • Canon PowerShot G1 X Mark III
  • Fujifilm X-H1
  • Hasselblad X1D
  • Olympus Stylus 1s
  • Panasonic DC-G9
  • Sony A7 Mark III

Lens Support

The updates also add support for these lenses:

  • Fujifilm
    • GF 23mm f/4 R LM WR
    • GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR
    • GF 45mm f/2.8 R WR
    • GF 63mm f/2.8 R WR
    • GF 110mm f/2 R LM WR
    • GF 120mm f/4 R LM OIS WR Macro
  • Panasonic
    • Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4.0
  • Sony
    • FE 12-24mm f/4 G
    • FE 24-105mm f/4 G OSS

Your Feedback

Many of the enhancements we make to Exposure are in response to user requests. Thank you for taking the time to connect with us and for telling us about the features you need. Your feedback helps us continue to make Exposure the fastest way to bring your vision to life.

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