I had a little chat with January’s Flickr winner, Camilo Díez. I thought I’d share a bit of the convo with our blog readers.

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Camilo is an up-and-coming graphic designer, an enthusiastic videographer, and a writer, too. He’s focused on Visual Arts during his study at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, in Colombia. He’s been getting into fine art photography over the past 6 months. So far, it’s been a love story–he can’t imagine doing anything else.

Camilo also does branding and visual identity work, which are fancy words for logo design. And he co-wrote, directed, and did post work on the short film “Temporada de Caza.” The film has an expected release date sometime in 2014.

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The double exposure project came from the inspiration he received while perusing the stunning work of Anna Pantelia and Peter Bialobrzeski. Consequently, that’s where he got the name Heimat. Camilo wanted the portrait to emote as much imposing stoicism as possible, so he prepped the whole shoot as well as the model. He drew out an involved plan to hide some of the models features and emphasize others. It sounds like a tricky process.

Camilo admits that post-production was challenging. He wanted to perfectly merge the two shots and give them a stylistic B&W treatment. Camilo said that the first few steps of the workflow, such as removing the excess blue in the sky, setting the building layer to Lighten mode, and making refinements to the composition, weren’t the most technically difficult tasks to perform. Even though they weren’t hard to do, they did need a lot of artistic finesse before they looked right.

At this point in the workflow, Camilo had results similar to the incredible double-exposure pics of Dylan and Sara Howell, but he didn’t stop there. He took it a step further by using sets of duplicate layers to extract bits and pieces of the structure. Camilo wanted the building to be contained by the model’s head and shoulders as well as reach outside of it. For instance, from the forehead up, he used delicate toning on duplicate layers to work in with the effects on the other side of the head.

After all was said and done, Camilo used Blow Up 3 to resize the shot for his final print. He was amazed by the quality and the image definition that Blow Up rendered. That’s great to hear! We’re proud to say he’s another happy customer. Great little story. Thanks for sharing, Camilo!

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Check out more of Camilo’s work on his website and in his Flickr photostream.